5 tips to declutter your mind

Too much to do?

It’s familiar to lots of us,  important deadlines, and no matter how hard we try, we can’t stop thinking about something or someone else. Ongoing conflict, an unresolved issue, or something we need to put on the seemingly endless “to do” list. Whatever it is, having too much mental clutter can prevent us focusing on important tasks in the present.

Here are five quick tips you can use as a quick fix to de-clutter your mind and get on with your day.

1. Meditate

Even a few minutes of silent meditation can be enough to clear your mind of excess clutter, help you feel more grounded, and improve your focus. For a simple meditation, set a timer for five minutes, focus your eyes a few feet in front of you and shift your focus to your breathing. Whenever you notice yourself getting caught up in thoughts, don’t worry. Just bring your awareness back to your breathing as soon as you become aware that your mind is wandering.

2. Journal

Stream-of-consciousness journaling is a great way to get your thoughts and feelings out of your head and onto paper, especially if you’re getting distracted by thoughts about a particular person, situation or event.

This kind of journaling is easy in theory, but in practise it can feel alien at first and it can take a few tries to get used to it. To make the most out of stream-of-consciousness journaling, take a blank page (or blank screen) and simply write down whatever comes into your head. All thoughts go on paper, even “I don’t know what to write”.

When we journal using stream-of-consciousness, it’s easy to slip into self-censorship and judgements about what we’re writing. For this kind of journaling to be effective, try to suspend any thoughts about what you should or shouldn’t be writing, the quality of your spelling and grammar, or whether what you’re writing even makes sense. Those things don’t matter; the most important thing is that you have a place to channel your thoughts, whatever they might be.

3. Talk about it

Talking to others about the topics that are cluttering your mind has two main benefits: it can help you feel validated and heard, and it can also provide you with a different perspective. Often, just having someone listen to and understand what’s on your mind helps relieve some of the urgency and intensity of the thoughts. Likewise, hearing someone else’s thoughts and perspectives about what’s on your mind can leave you with new insights and resolution.

4. Do a core brain dump – dump the stuff in your head!

If you’re not preoccupied with one topic in particular, but are struggling to stay focused in light of an overwhelming to-do list, brainstorming or carrying out a core dump could be the mental de-cluttering method for you.

A ‘core dump’ is a term devised by David Allen, the author of Getting Things Done, which is one of the most popular productivity systems in the world. When you carry out a core dump, you write down everything you can think of that requires you to do or remember something, and then organise these items into individual tasks and projects. The more information you store in your head, the more cluttered your thoughts will feel. Transferring these to-do items from your head onto paper or screen frees up valuable space in your mind so you can focus on other things.

5. Change your scene

Changing your scene might sound too simplistic to be effective, but it really works. When we perform the same activities in the same place over and over again (for example, writing reports in our office), we can get stuck in mental ruts that are associated with that particular activity and place. Moving the activity to a different location can help us look at it with fresh eyes, a fresh perspective and a new focus, relieving the mental boredom that might lead our mind to wander to other things.

Finally allow yourself to be quiet, its ok to be quiet and calm.

1. Unwind on the Way Home

The speech, pace, energy is different at the office then at home. Utilize your drive home to help you change gears and make the transition. Don’t continue the over stimulation by listening to news or talking on your cell phone. By keeping quiet your vital signs will slow down and you can think about how you want to spend time with your family. Push away thoughts of the day and be ready for casual conversation at home.

2. Use other parts of brain

As the saying goes, “all work, no play makes Jack a dull boy” Have things going on at home that stimulates other parts of your brain. For most of us keyed-up, type-A personalities sometimes doing nothing is not remedy, many times it is doing something fun and stimulating to other parts of our brain giving our work brain a rest.

3. Schedule time with friends

What gets put on your calendar gets done. You have to make your friends a priority. The best way to ensure they are is to officially get them on your calendar. Make an appointment once a week to have lunch or dinner with a friend. Also every time you meet, coordinate your schedules on the spot for your next get-together.

– See more at: http://www.success.com/article/3-tips-for-conquering-mind-clutter#sthash.eIytb9zW.dpuf

1. Unwind on the Way Home

The speech, pace, energy is different at the office then at home. Utilize your drive home to help you change gears and make the transition. Don’t continue the over stimulation by listening to news or talking on your cell phone. By keeping quiet your vital signs will slow down and you can think about how you want to spend time with your family. Push away thoughts of the day and be ready for casual conversation at home.

2. Use other parts of brain

As the saying goes, “all work, no play makes Jack a dull boy” Have things going on at home that stimulates other parts of your brain. For most of us keyed-up, type-A personalities sometimes doing nothing is not remedy, many times it is doing something fun and stimulating to other parts of our brain giving our work brain a rest.

3. Schedule time with friends

What gets put on your calendar gets done. You have to make your friends a priority. The best way to ensure they are is to officially get them on your calendar. Make an appointment once a week to have lunch or dinner with a friend. Also every time you meet, coordinate your schedules on the spot for your next get-together.

– See more at: http://www.success.com/article/3-tips-for-conquering-mind-clutter#sthash.eIytb9zW.dpuf

1. Unwind on the Way Home

The speech, pace, energy is different at the office then at home. Utilize your drive home to help you change gears and make the transition. Don’t continue the over stimulation by listening to news or talking on your cell phone. By keeping quiet your vital signs will slow down and you can think about how you want to spend time with your family. Push away thoughts of the day and be ready for casual conversation at home.

2. Use other parts of brain

As the saying goes, “all work, no play makes Jack a dull boy” Have things going on at home that stimulates other parts of your brain. For most of us keyed-up, type-A personalities sometimes doing nothing is not remedy, many times it is doing something fun and stimulating to other parts of our brain giving our work brain a rest.

3. Schedule time with friends

What gets put on your calendar gets done. You have to make your friends a priority. The best way to ensure they are is to officially get them on your calendar. Make an appointment once a week to have lunch or dinner with a friend. Also every time you meet, coordinate your schedules on the spot for your next get-together.

– See more at: http://www.success.com/article/3-tips-for-conquering-mind-clutter#sthash.eIytb9zW.dpuf

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